Monthly Archives: September 2014

Vaccination Coverage: Where We’re At and Where We’re Going

Shot of Prevention

With school back in full swing, it won’t be long before parents start seeing report cards.  While report cards may reflect a child’s performance on class tests and quizzes, grades alone can not determine if a child is working hard to reach their full potential.  When it comes to immunizations, yearly vaccination coverage data is often used in much the same way.  A report is made that estimates the previous year’s vaccination coverage, but the data needs to be put in perspective in order to be put to good use.

When it comes to vaccination coverage among young children in the US, the yearly National Immunization Survey is the ultimate benchmark.   Year after year data sets are compiled and used for ongoing analysis of vaccination levels, pointing to successes and shortfalls.  These reports help us to determine where we’ve been and where we’re headed.

This year’s 2013 “report card” for children 19-35…

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NOVA Film “Vaccines-Calling the Shots” Opens the Door for Dialogue

Shot of Prevention

After viewing the PBS NOVA film “Vaccines – Calling the Shots”, I began wondering what the film’s impact would be.  I’ll admit that the film was very ambitious.  It addressed the science behind vaccines, why they work, how they work & even touched upon how people assess risk and decide whether to vaccinate or not.  All this in less than an hour.

Of course, no one should expect this film to be the one defining piece that will convince people to vaccinate.  Certainly it may reinforce the decision of those who already choose to vaccinate.  And it may give pause to those who would otherwise refrain from vaccinating.  But most importantly, this film is a valuable tool to help educate people about the science behind vaccines, inform the public about the importance of herd immunity and the dangers of not vaccinating, and open the door for civil dialogue about common vaccine safety…

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